Camus

Sartre VS Camus

Sartre VS Camus

Introduction on Sartre vs Camus : War & Philosophy : An historical background The relationship between Sartre/Camus has modeled the post-war french philosophy. Since 1943, Sartre and Camus, great friends, are everywhere together. The public, without detail, includes the author of ‘Nausea‘ and of ‘The Stranger‘ under the label ‘Existentialist‘. After the liberation, existentialism is a much more than a fashionable philosophy, it is a lifestyle and a place: Saint-Germain-des-Prés (Paris area). “Existentialism Is a Humanism” conveniently summarizes this philosophy. For the public it can be summarized in one phrase: “existence precedes essence“. Sartre’s existentialism designed first as a philosophy of freedom and responsibility: we are what we do, not beings whose fate is predetermined. The key word of the day is ‘commitment‘. Camus certainly do not refuse to engage, but refuses the label ‘existentialist’ and even that of a philosopher. From 1947, political disagreements between Sartre and Camus...

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Camus and Absurdism

Camus and Absurdism

The Concept of absurd plays a major role in Camus and existentialism philosophy: the Stranger (1942) and the Myth of Sisyphus (1942) defines the absurd as the divorce between man and the world. General Definitions: In Latin absurdus, which has forged a sound that unusual, absurd, preposterous. - Logic: contradictory, contrary to logic and its rules, which violates these rules. - Vocabulary existentialist: refers to what is meaningless, what can not be rationally justified (eg human existence is absurd). Specific definitions of philosophers: Sartre: - “Such a choice is as absurd beyond all reason” (Being and Nothingness) Camus: - “The world itself is not reasonable But what is absurd is the confrontation of this irrational and (the) desperate desire for clarity whose call echoes in the depths of man ” (The Myth of Sisyphus) Expressions and terms related or derivative: Reasoning (reductio ad absurdum): type of reasoning that...

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Camus Quotes

Camus Quotes

Best quotes by Albert Camus The philosophy of Albert Camus radiates in all fields of social sciences: essay, theater, novels. Criticized for his nihilism, his philosophy can be related to existentialism. Camus‘s accents are Pascalian, Kierkegaardian even sometimes Kafkaesque. The philosophy of the absurd means the human condition, ordered to find by himself the meaning of life. However, the absurd is a philosophy of action, of rebellion. By acting, men re-inject meaning in the world. Camus’ major works are: - The Myth of Sisyphus - The Rebel - The Fall - The stranger - The Plague Camus, absurdity and nihilism: - “The absurd is lucid reason that recognizes its limits” - “God denies the world, and I deny God! Cheers anything because it’s the only thing that exists!” - “The absurd is born of this confrontation between the human call and the unreasonable silence of the world” Camus and...

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Camus: The Stranger (Analysis)

Camus: The Stranger (Analysis)

The Stranger by Camus: Analysis of an absurd novel The anti-hero Meursault at the beginning of the novel, is invited to the funeral of his mother where he does not cry. Everything is reckless, Meursault is someone who considers life and routine as absurd. His  indifference is hated and condemned by others. The whole first part of this book describes the absurdity of life and all the indifference he feels. Corresponding to the second trial after the murder of an Arab man in Meursault. This part is disorganized as to time proving that Meursault in prison, lack of time markers in contrast to the first part, linear, held almost daily in the order when the main character is still free. His death sentence proves the absurdity of life. Meursault, in prison, is desperate and is faced with the indifference of the world. It is this silence against the appeal unreasonable is...

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Camus: The Fall (Analysis)

The Fall by Camus explores the theme of guilt: the thesis of this philosophical novel in one sentence: we are all responsible for everything. If the plague was focused on the action, the Fall for its analysis of the theme of inaction and its consequences. Summary of the Fall by Camus The Fall is indeed the story of a confession of a man to another in a bar in Amsterdam, in the form of a monologue. Jean-Baptiste Clamence, former Parisian lawyer, recounts the events that changed his life. Before this event, Clamence describes himself as a perfect selfish love of life itself. Until the evening when, returning home, he passes over a bridge which he intends to throw a girl. He did not carry emergency. From that time, guilt inflates to become an obsession. This event sheds new light on its entire existence, when it deems as unnecessary and...

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