Rousseau

Rousseau’s Philosophy Summary

Rousseau’s Philosophy Summary

The Philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau Genevan philosopher writing in French, Jean-Jacques Rousseau wrote essentially: - Discourse on the Sciences and Arts (1750) - Discourse on the Origin of Inequality among men (1755) - The Social Contract (1762) - Emile – On Education (1762) Rousseau has been subject to multiple interpretations, often contradictory and caricatured and beyond these, critics have beens sometimes simplistic, but the attentive reader discovers in these works an original and coherent thinker, which was fundamentally interested in the real contract, and repressing the world of violence. Rousseau’s key political ideas was the general will rather than the social contract. Political society is seen by Rousseau as involving the total voluntary subjection of every individual to the collective general will; this being both the sole source of legitimate sovereignty and something that cannot but be directed towards the common good. Rousseau and the natural man theory: So...

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Rousseau: Discourse on Inequality (Summary)

Rousseau: Discourse on Inequality (Summary)

Discourse on the Origin and Basis of Inequality Among Men by Jean Jacques Rousseau : The story of the mankind Rousseau’s Discourse on Inequality is one of the strongest critics of modernity ever written. Rousseau describes the ravages of modernity on human nature and civilization inequality are nested according to the Genevan thinker. This speech, unlike an essay, is written with a pen passionate, even fiery at times, making reading a pleasure. In terms of methodology, Rousseau traces the journey of humanity from its origin (but outside any religious context), the paints in his state of nature to better understand how humanity, decadent according to him, got there . Rousseau distinguishes two types of inequality: natural (or physical) and moral. The natural inequality stems from differences in age, health, or other physical characteristics. The moral inequality is established by a convention of men. Rousseau will therefore explore the origin...

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Rousseau: Emile (Summary)

Emile or On Education, by Jean-Jacques Rousseau, exposes the philosophy of education of the Genevan thinker. As the Social Contract, Emile was immediately banned by the authorities because it criticizes Rousseau’s rejection of traditional conceptions of religion. This book describes the dialogue between the tutor and Emile, from birth to adulthood. Rousseau, Anthropology and Education: Philosophy of Education has its roots in Rousseau’s anthropology (or philosophy of subjectivity), presented in the Discourse on the Origin of Inequality among Men: human beings are inherently good. Thus, the role of education is to cultivate that goodness as a natural tendency. However, Rousseau does not advocate a return to the state of nature, but rather an improvement of vital statistics. We should not strive to be of noble savages because they have no social ties, while others require the civil and social skills. In this sense, if the self-esteem, equivalent to selfishness,...

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Rousseau and Human Nature

Rousseau and Human Nature

Rousseau: A Philosophy of Nature The Philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau is a huge moral and political edifice. From Emile to the Social Contract, Rousseau presents his vision of humanity as it should be. Rousseau has a deep dislike and disgust for the man as he is. His philosophy is essentially reactive, reactionary against the society and the modernity. In the Discorse on the origin of inequality among men, Rousseau develops an extended metaphor about the state of nature, that is to say the pre-civilizational state. He describes this period of humanity as the happiest of humanity.  In state of nature, man is self-sufficient and cultivates his plot of land freely. Man is stupid, strong, candid, natural being. He knows neither good nor evil and lives in the present, worry-free about tomorrow. Cons Hobbes, who described the state of nature as a state of war, Rousseau makes the pre-civilizational state a...

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